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Why Should We Hire You? Give a FAB Response!

Posted by Tami Riggs

Apr 20, 2022 10:00:00 AM

FAB is an acronym for Features, Advantages, and Benefits. FAB is a common 3-Step strategy employed in sales and marketing to generate interest in products. However, the technique can also be utilized during an interview to SELL yourself and fit any expertise acquired through experience, education, and training to specific job requirements. Consider the following when organizing your FAB responses:
Why should we hire you


Feature – What key factors, attributes, and skills do you have as required by the position?
Advantage – What strengths do your accomplishments, abilities, or past performance indicate relative to the competition?
Benefit – What is the result or value an employer can anticipate from hiring you?

A paralegal job description will typically require the ability to prepare legal documents and correspondence as well as the ability to organize and maintain files. The examples below illustrate how you can use the FAB method to focus your responses, so they are more impactful.

Example 1
Feature: You earned a Paralegal Credential
Advantage: You understand the legal process and terminology better than someone without a credential
Benefit: You are qualified through education and training to perform substantive legal work that requires knowledge of legal concepts, and as a result, can complete the work more quickly and effectively.

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Topics: graduates and alumni, credentials, career, paralegal skills, education and training, featured

Houston Metropolitan Paralegal Association on Campus 12/7

Posted by Tami Riggs

Nov 13, 2019 12:33:58 PM

Membership in a paralegal association is a great way to make professional connections and support your paralegal career!

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Topics: credentials, career

Guide: How to become a paralegal

Posted by Center for Advanced Legal Studies [CALS]

Jun 6, 2017 2:15:00 PM

blog-how-to-become-paralegal

According to the National Federation of Paralegal Associations, 85% of paralegals have formal paralegal training. For future paralegals, this statistic is critically important. Your likelihood of career success—from receiving an invitation to interview for a position, to earning a competitive salary—increases if you pursue an appropriate paralegal education.

However, with multiple training options available, and roughly 600 paralegal programs in the United States alone, determining the meaning of “appropriate” can be difficult. To assist you, the below is an introductory guide to how to become a paralegal.

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Topics: credentials, career, education and training

What Is An Average Paralegal Salary?

Posted by Center for Advanced Legal Studies [CALS]

May 16, 2017 2:20:00 PM

paralegal salary expectations

If you are considering a career as a paralegal, you may understandably wonder what salary you could command in such a role. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average paralegal salary in 2016 was $49,500.1 However, it is important to recognize that this figure can vary as a result of several factors.

What are these factors? As a prospective paralegal, do you have any control over them, and if so, how can you increase your earning potential if you ultimately decide to enter this field?

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Topics: credentials, career, education and training

The Importance of Accreditation

Posted by Eric H. Happe

Nov 12, 2015 3:12:13 PM

accredited.jpg

[Updated March 30, 2022]
The first step to becoming a paralegal is to get your degree or certificate from an accredited institution. Accreditation gives merit to any credential.


What is accreditation? The goal of accreditation is to ensure that institutions of higher education meet acceptable levels of quality. Accreditation in the United States involves non-governmental entities (accrediting organizations) as well as federal and state government agencies (these three entities are formally known as the Triad). Accreditation's quality assurance function is one of the three main elements of oversight governing the Higher Education Act's (HEA's) federal student aid programs. In order for students to receive federal student aid from the U.S. Department of Education (Department) for postsecondary study, the institution must be accredited by a "nationally recognized" accrediting agency.1 

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Topics: online classes, paralegal certificate, credentials, education and training

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